Salty Fly Tying - A Fly Tying Blog

Salty Fly Tying

A Fly Tying Blog

Fly Tying Tips – Working with Feathers 2

Posted by Drew Chicone On January 20th

 Fly Tying Tips

 This is the third installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

Do Not Create a Gap Between Barbs

Often times it is advised to create a small gap or opening between the barbs for a clean tie in point, but I do not advise this technique.  Even stroking back a few of the barbules to create a small gap can cause problems.

 

Make Warps On Top of Folded Back Barbs

Your best bet is to fold back all the barbules, and make your wraps on top.  Even though they are slender, the extra bulk will help to fill in all the tiny gaps and make the bundle more stable.   Think of barbs like filler that can be compressed against the hook for added stability.

 

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my fly tying tips, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

 

 

 

 

Fly Tying Tips & Tricks – Working with Feathers

Posted by Drew Chicone On January 6th

 Fly Tying Tips

This is the second installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

If you are using really webbie feathers, you can trim a section of the quill, but make sure you leave some of the barbs attached to the stem of the feather. Although there is not a large volume of bars left attached, this added width will provide more surface area and help to keep the feather from sliding out of place or spinning when thread pressure is applied.

Often, beginners will strip away a section of barbs from the quill in order to make it easier to see their wraps when tying in a single or multiple feathers.  This exposes the bare quill or Richis of the feather.  Depending on what type of feather is being used, the round or triangular quill of the feather is cinched down against other round feathers and a round surface of the hook and you guessed it… the feathers roll every which way.  Keeping those barbules on the quill is crucial to securing the feathers in the position they were intended.

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my fly tying tips, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

 

Fly Tying Tips & Tricks – Fly Tying Thread

Posted by Drew Chicone On December 22nd

This is the first installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

 

Flatten Your Thread

First and foremost, when you are working with feathers, you need to make sure your thread is flat!  Fly tying thread is made up of multiple filaments or fibers that are twisted together.   There are situations for using a tightly twisted or compressed thread, but this is definitely not one of them.

Compressed Thread

If you are a right-handed tier, with each wrap you are twisting the thread, and eventually it becomes round like a rope.  For right-handed tiers, spinning the bobbin to the left will untwist it and cause the thread fibers to lay flat. Flattened thread has more surface area and is more efficient at gathering and locking materials in place. After every few wraps you make and before you add any new materials, it is very important that you spin your bobbin until your thread is flat.

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my tip’s, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

 

 

 

Feathers – Fly Tying Tips, Tricks & Common Mistakes

Posted by Drew Chicone On December 10th

Hey there!

Drew Chicone here.  Welcome to the Salty Fly Tying Blog!

My goal for this Blog is to share ideas related to saltwater pattern development, help you create more effective saltwater flies, and ultimately catch more fish.

After teaching fly tying for several years, I have come to the realization that feathers cause more confusion and frustration than any other material. For both beginning fly tiers and seasoned pros alike, keeping them secured strait and even on the hook is a onerous chore that can suck the fun right out of fly tying.

That being said, I figured it was a good place to start.  Over the next few weeks I will do my best to explain the in’s and out’s of working with feathers and essential techniques needed to keep saddles from rolling.  As always, you can stay tuned to this blog over the coming weeks as I share each of the tips from my eBook, or you can simply click the icon to your right and download it for free, today.

If you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email.

-Drew

Recapping Redfish Flies by Drew Chicone

Posted by Drew Chicone On November 26th

Redfish Flies - Drew Chicone

Over the past few weeks I have given you the basics on the 8 proven pattens from my latest book “Redfish Flies”.  Simply click on the link or icon above to download the 175 page pdf. of “Redfish Flies“, illustrated with ultra-hi resolution step-by-step instructions for $14.99 or head over to www.saltyflytying.com to  order your signed paperback version for $24.99.

The eight pattens outlined in Redfish Flies have been fine-tuned and rigorously tested on countless grass flats, oyster bars and mangrove shorelines.  Tying and stocking your box with this proven assortment of flies will ensure you have the ammunition need to coax even the most refined redfish, and the insight provided in the interviews of the contributing guides and tying guru’s will help you understand what factors need to be consider to create your own productive redfish flies.

Otherwise, read on and I’ll recap all of the material covered in the past post from “Redfish Flies”.

  1. The Kung Fu Blue Crab – Redfish Flies
  2. The Fiddle Sticks Crab – Redfish Flies
  3. The Pine Island Ice Tea – Redfish Flies
  4. The Buddagrassy Shrimp – Redfish Flies
  5. The Rump Shaker – Redfish Flies
  6. The Grass Monkey – Redfish Flies
  7. The Gulf Shrimp – Redfish Flies
  8. The Batman – Redfish Flies

For more information on how  you can improve your own saltwater fly patterns check out my website www.saltyflytying.com or;

August 2014 Salty Fly Tying Chronicle

 

For a deep dive into the world of saltwater pattern development, pick up a copy of  Feather Brain – Developing, Testing, & Improving Saltwater Fly Patterns.” 

Feather Brain TransBoxshot-F&B

Thanks for reading, and if you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email – drew@saltyflytying.com.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

The Batman – Redfish Flies

Posted by Drew Chicone On November 13th

Pattern by Don Reed

_MG_7312 - Version 2

IMG_6061

Has the pattern evolved or changed any over time (Materials, Tying Techniques etc.)?

The fly has remained basically the same over the years as I tie the fly. But like any good pattern, different variations have come along from other tiers. I have seen monofilament threaded through the claws to stiffen them, tailing added making it more of a slider, and many other improvements or changes for specific applications. My only change has been the addition of an orange “egg sac” of Finnish Raccoon around the tailing flash.

This is the ninth installment of  Redfish Flies. To read the rest of the interview, and for the complete step-by-step instructions for tying this redfish fly and 7 more,  download your copy of Redfish Flies at www.saltyflytying.com $14.99 or order your Signed Paperback version today ! $24.99 + Shipping.

_MG_9436

In your opinion what makes the pattern so effective?

In my opinion the fly has remained so effective over the years is that it mimics many different crabs and other crustaceans, is easy to tie, easy to cast and fish, and it produces.

 

Redfish Flies - Drew ChiconeRedfish Flies - Drew Chicone

This 175 page downloadable pdf. is illustrated with ultra-hi resolution  step-by-step instructions, click the link, or icon to download your copy today.  $14.99  Or order your signed paperback version at saltyflytying.com $24.99.  Detailed instructions for tying Drew Chicone’s Kung Fu Blue Crab, Capt. Ron Ratliff’s Fiddle Sticks Crab, Capt. Daniel Andrews’s Pine Island Ice Tea, Drei Stroman’s Budagrassy Shrimp, Chris Kincaid’s Rump Shaker, Capt. Joe Costadura’s Grass Monkey, Bill Laminack’s Gulf Shrimp, and Don Reed’s Batman pattern.

 

If you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight!

-Drew

 

 

The Gulf Shrimp – Redfish Flies

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 30th

Pattern by Bill Laminack

IMG_5832

 

Why did you choose the materials you did and the techniques to apply them?

Most of the materials choice was based on trying to achieve the most realistic appearance possible. Applying Epoxy over Monofilament as a base creates the perfect translucent appearance that matches live shrimp quite closely. Applying a little bit of appropriate colored marker over the monofilament bleeds in and creates nice life like blends of colors. The antennae and some of mouth parts are created from Kanekalon or Yak Hair. These materials are readily available, durable and cheap. The original eyes are made from 11/0 Glass Beads from Craft stores and coated in epoxy, much like many other crab and shrimp patterns.   The EP Shrimp eyes will work if you do not have the time or materials to create your own.

This is the eighth installment of  Redfish Flies. To read the rest of the interview, and for the complete step-by-step instructions for tying this redfish fly and 7 more,  download your copy of Redfish Flies at www.saltyflytying.com $14.99 or order your Signed Paperback version today ! $24.99 + Shipping.

 

2014-07-11 05.38.57

In your opinion what makes the pattern so effective?

A relatively slow sink rate with a hook riding up allows you to fish the fly over grass flats that are 2′ or more. This allows you to present a very accurate shrimp fly in to the exact places where redfish are looking for shrimp and crabs. The sight of a shrimp popping over the tops of sea grass is just something that few redfish can resist.

 

Redfish Flies - Drew ChiconeRedfish Flies - Drew Chicone

This 175 page downloadable pdf. is illustrated with ultra-hi resolution  step-by-step instructions, click the link, or icon to download your copy today.  $14.99  Or order your signed paperback version at saltyflytying.com $24.99.  Detailed instructions for tying Drew Chicone’s Kung Fu Blue Crab, Capt. Ron Ratliff’s Fiddle Sticks Crab, Capt. Daniel Andrews’s Pine Island Ice Tea, Drei Stroman’s Budagrassy Shrimp, Chris Kincaid’s Rump Shaker, Capt. Joe Costadura’s Grass Monkey, Bill Laminack’s Gulf Shrimp, and Don Reed’s Batman pattern.

 

If you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight!

-Drew

 

 

The Grass Monkey – Redfish Flies

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 16th

Pattern by Capt. Joe Costadura

IMG_5797

What factors led you to design the pattern?

I’ve always been a spontaneous kind of fly tyer.  Sometimes I’ll set out to tie a particular pattern and then come up with an improvised version or one that turns into something completely all it’s own. This particular pattern actually started out as a bend back without the bend or a reverse tie as they’re sometimes called.  Because it had bead chain it would sink slightly faster.  By adding the deer hair head it actually helps keep the fly exactly in the column of water I want and also adds bulk and body to the fly, which makes it push more water. I believe this draws more strikes especially in a shallow water situation. In the end it became more of a Slider pattern like the Tim Borski Redfish Slider, which has always been one of my favorite Redfish bugs.

This is the seventh installment of  Redfish Flies. To read the rest of the interview, and for the complete step-by-step instructions for tying this redfish fly and 7 more,  download your copy of Redfish Flies at www.saltyflytying.com $14.99 or order your Signed Paperback version today ! $24.99 + Shipping.

IMG_7789

What conditions/environment/situation was the fly designed to be fished in?

Olive craft fur really is just one of those versatile materials which is synonymous with back country fly tying and I’m really no exception when it comes to using it. The deer hair gives the fly a little buoyancy which keeps it just above the grass and in the fish’s line of sight. The Estaz chenille gives the fly body as well as flash, which will also make it stand out if you find yourself in a little dirtier water. And the gold Flashabou is just a little added flavor since its no secret that Redfish like gold (gold spoons, hint hint!).

 

Redfish Flies - Drew ChiconeRedfish Flies - Drew Chicone

This 175 page downloadable pdf. is illustrated with ultra-hi resolution  step-by-step instructions, click the link, or icon to download your copy today.  $14.99  Or order your signed paperback version at saltyflytying.com $24.99.  Detailed instructions for tying Drew Chicone’s Kung Fu Blue Crab, Capt. Ron Ratliff’s Fiddle Sticks Crab, Capt. Daniel Andrews’s Pine Island Ice Tea, Drei Stroman’s Budagrassy Shrimp, Chris Kincaid’s Rump Shaker, Capt. Joe Costadura’s Grass Monkey, Bill Laminack’s Gulf Shrimp, and Don Reed’s Batman pattern.

 

If you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight!

-Drew

The Rump Shaker – Redfish Flies

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 2nd

Pattern by Chris Kincaid

IMG_5739

Why did you choose the materials you did and the techniques to apply them?
I really wanted this fly to give the impression of a shrimp scooting backwards out of the grass, as if it was fleeing from an approaching predator. The weight of the medium bead chain eyes on the front of the fly and the upraised angle of the craft fur in the tail make this fly move in small bounces when retrieved, just like a shrimp.  The craft fur, Arctic fox body hair, and grizzly flutter legs mimic the appearance of the larger legs towards the front of a shrimp’s body and the EP wooly critter brush tapers down to mimic the appearance of the smaller legs towards the tail.

This is the sixth installment of  Redfish Flies. To read the rest of the interview, and for the complete step-by-step instructions for tying this redfish fly and 7 more,  download your copy of Redfish Flies at www.saltyflytying.com $14.99 or order your Signed Paperback version today ! $24.99 + Shipping.

Red Close up

How do you recommend fishing the fly?

Most of the time I am sight fishing so I try and get the fly directly in front of the fish, or cast and retrieve it where it would intercept the fish about 1’ in front of its face. Don’t be bashful; this fly makes a fairly stealthy water entry. Watch the redfish’s body language and you will be able to tell when the redfish first spots fly. He will usually do one of two things; charge forward and inhale the fly, or he will begin to follow with curiosity. If you get a fish that is following, try speeding up your retrieve to invoke him to charge and eat.

Redfish Flies - Drew ChiconeRedfish Flies - Drew Chicone

This 175 page downloadable pdf. is illustrated with ultra-hi resolution  step-by-step instructions, click the link, or icon to download your copy today.  $14.99  Or order your signed paperback version at saltyflytying.com $24.99.  Detailed instructions for tying Drew Chicone’s Kung Fu Blue Crab, Capt. Ron Ratliff’s Fiddle Sticks Crab, Capt. Daniel Andrews’s Pine Island Ice Tea, Drei Stroman’s Budagrassy Shrimp, Chris Kincaid’s Rump Shaker, Capt. Joe Costadura’s Grass Monkey, Bill Laminack’s Gulf Shrimp, and Don Reed’s Batman pattern.

 

If you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight!

-Drew

 

The Buddagrassy Shrimp – Redfish Flies

Posted by Drew Chicone On September 23rd

Pattern by Drei Stroman

IMG_4512

What conditions/environment/situation was the fly designed to be fished in?
Being that this fly represents a tasty treat, this fly can be fished in all conditions all year. The best conditions will always be clear calm. I also like it when the waters are a little stirred up.

This shrimp can be fished in many ways, with floating, intermediate or sinking lines. This of course will be based on where you are fishing and for what. You know that the best way to use this fly is to first fish it in shallow waters. This way you can get a better understanding of how to work the fly. Grass and sand flats, pot holes, drop-offs, current and of course structure are my favorite way to fish this fly. I find that fishing with a sinking line in the undercuts of banks with a soft tidal change is great for those fish holding there.

I really like to fish this fly on an intermediate or sinking line in deep cuts and drop-offs during tidal changes when the current is beginning to flow.

 

This is the fifth installment of  Redfish Flies. To read the rest of the interview, and for the complete step-by-step instructions for tying this redfish fly and 7 more,  download your copy of Redfish Flies at www.saltyflytying.com $14.99 or order your Signed Paperback version today ! $24.99 + Shipping.

IMG_5605

Has the pattern evolved or changed any over time (Materials, Tying Techniques etc.)?
No, not by much. The two changes are the hook (based on species being fished) and the addition of hollow tubing to aid the antennae from fouling (optional). I am always looking for a material to replace the main body of the fly…why?  I’d like a little tougher material that has a buoyancy factor. This material also needs to be compatible with the glues used for binding the materials together. This will also keep the fly in business longer….ha-ha!

 

 

Redfish Flies - Drew ChiconeRedfish Flies - Drew Chicone

This 175 page downloadable pdf. is illustrated with ultra-hi resolution  step-by-step instructions, click the link, or icon to download your copy today.  $14.99  Or order your signed paperback version at saltyflytying.com $24.99.  Detailed instructions for tying Drew Chicone’s Kung Fu Blue Crab, Capt. Ron Ratliff’s Fiddle Sticks Crab, Capt. Daniel Andrews’s Pine Island Ice Tea, Drei Stroman’s Budagrassy Shrimp, Chris Kincaid’s Rump Shaker, Capt. Joe Costadura’s Grass Monkey, Bill Laminack’s Gulf Shrimp, and Don Reed’s Batman pattern.

 

If you have questions or other topics in mind you would like explained, feel free to comment or send me an email.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight!

-Drew