Salty Fly Tying - A Fly Tying Blog

Salty Fly Tying

A Fly Tying Blog

Archive for October, 2012

A Little Glue Goes A Long Way

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 25th

This is the Forth installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

Use a Small Amount of Glue for Extra Stability

Once you have the tips of your feathers lined up you can apply a small amount of glue to keep them from moving when you are tying them in.  The glue will also help keep the feathers from rolling and on top of the hook and as you secure them.  However, some types of glue become very hard and brittle and tend to glob up your flies, so test a few and see which one works best for you.  If you are going to use any kind of quick drying glue’s (like super glue) it is easier to lay down a thread base and paint a small amount of glue directly on the thread where the feathers will be tied in.  This technique works well, but requires you to work quickly.

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my tip’s, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

 

 

 

Gaps Are No Good

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 18th

 This is the third installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

Do Not Create a Gap Between Barbs

Often times it is advised to create a small gap or opening between the barbs for a clean tie in point, but I do not advise this technique.  Even stroking back a few of the barbules to create a small gap can cause problems.

 

Make Warps On Top of Folded Back Barbs

Your best bet is to fold back all the barbules, and make your wraps on top.  Even though they are slender, the extra bulk will help to fill in all the tiny gaps and make the bundle more stable.   Think of barbs like filler that can be compressed against the hook for added stability.

 

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my tip’s, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

 

 

 

 

 

If You’re Going To Trim…Leave A Little

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 11th

This is the second installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

If you are using really webbie feathers, you can trim a section of the quill, but make sure you leave some of the barbs attached to the stem of the feather. Although there is not a large volume of bars left attached, this added width will provide more surface area and help to keep the feather from sliding out of place or spinning when thread pressure is applied.

Often, beginners will strip away a section of barbs from the quill in order to make it easier to see their wraps when tying in a single or multiple feathers.  This exposes the bare quill or Richis of the feather.  Depending on what type of feather is being used, the round or triangular quill of the feather is cinched down against other round feathers and a round surface of the hook and you guessed it… the feathers roll every which way.  Keeping those barbules on the quill is crucial to securing the feathers in the position they were intended.

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my tip’s, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew

 

 

Flatten Your Thread

Posted by Drew Chicone On October 4th

This is the first installment of  Feathers – Tip’s, Trick’s & Common Mistakes, which can be downloaded FREE from www.saltyflytying.com

 

Flatten Your Thread

First and foremost, when you are working with feathers, you need to make sure your thread is flat!  Fly tying thread is made up of multiple filaments or fibers that are twisted together.   There are situations for using a tightly twisted or compressed thread, but this is definitely not one of them.

Compressed Thread

If you are a right-handed tier, with each wrap you are twisting the thread, and eventually it becomes round like a rope.  For right-handed tiers, spinning the bobbin to the left will untwist it and cause the thread fibers to lay flat. Flattened thread has more surface area and is more efficient at gathering and locking materials in place. After every few wraps you make and before you add any new materials, it is very important that you spin your bobbin until your thread is flat.

 

Download my free eBook by clicking the icon to your right to read the rest of my tip’s, trick’s & common mistakes.

Keep Your Wraps Tight & Feathers Straight

-Drew